Achievement Hunter PC's

1 year ago

Since everyone seems to be wondering -- The Achievement Hunter PC's have the following base parts.

Case: Cooler Master HAF 922

Processor: Intel Core i7-4770K

Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer

Memory: G. Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2x8GB)

Graphics: PNY GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card

Hard Drive: Western Digital BLACK 1TB.

PCPartPicker link. (Use PC Part Picker to find the best deals on the parts, then use that to PriceMatch at your local PC store.)

Frequently Asked Questions / Comments.

Are they overclocked?
Not currently.

Did they come pre-built?
No, we built them ourselves. (@Gilby did most of it.)

Are they used for editing as well?
Ray & Ryan use theirs for editing. Otherwise no.

You do know those parts are overkill?
Absolutely. It's supposed to be.

Why No SSD's
Load times are easily edited out. We can upgrade if it becomes a problem.

You realise [insert-AH-crew] will break it in a year?
They probably already have.

Comments (90)

  • Saiph

    Saiph

    1 year ago

    Though not imperative to the core of their set up, I'd still be interested in knowing the few accessories the AH guys use...like monitors and mice and such.

  • qpStOoPiDqp

    qpStOoPiDqp

    1 year ago

    What program do AH use to record their PCs?

    • qpStOoPiDqp

      qpStOoPiDqp

      10 months ago

      Sorry for my crazy delay, but thanks!

    • Adam

      Adam Director of Technology

      1 year ago

      depends on the game

  • Moeparker

    Moeparker Ghost

    1 year ago

    I'm using this info to help me build a new PC. Mine is 2009. I can't wait, I love building a new PC. :D

    Good to know about PCpartpicker. That'll save me some mula.

  • zavvtheredd

    zavvtheredd

    1 year ago

    I'm trying to build a PC with specs around this right now, except I'm selecting a hexcore processor. So far the base parts that I'm not going down from are that, a 700 series Nvidia 3gb card, 1000w power supply, and at least 16gb of 1663 ram, but that puts one at least $3k in the hole. Then again, Go big or go home.

    • zavvtheredd

      zavvtheredd

      1 year ago

      You're a fucking rock star man. But I do not see any fans on there. Is liquid cooling worth investing in or would a normal, push/pull fan system be satisfactory? And is the SSD for just the OS? And also, you mean the 4790K instead of the 4690K, is that what you meant to say?

    • Adam

      Adam Director of Technology

      1 year ago

      This is what I built him, with some slight updating (new processor).

      His machine can do anything mine can, Mine just does it SLIGHTLY faster.

      IF you like streaming, I would highly recommend getting a 4790K instead of the 4690K, -- the Hyperthreading will help your computer performance a LOT. But, buy in large, the above linked computer will out perform 95% of computers on the market, play every game on max settings, ect.

      Post edited 7/16/14 5:49PM

    • zavvtheredd

      zavvtheredd

      1 year ago

      Seriously? Adam, could you hit me up with the specs of that machine? $1100 is so much more in my budget. But what's the difference between his machine and yours then? Could one not edit video as well on the cheaper machine? I don't just play video games, I really like streaming video games. That last part is probably what's going to cost me so much.

    • Adam

      Adam Director of Technology

      1 year ago

      for home gaming you can get away with a lot less money for about the same performance, If you're looking specifically at gaming.

      I built a friend a machine a few months ago, we spent $1100, and it rivals my $3500 machine in terms of FPS in games.

  • Pro_face14

    Pro_face14

    1 year ago

    I'm so jealous of these builds...I have a mid-range rig and can only dream of this kind of beauty.

  • BrandonSikes

    BrandonSikes

    1 year ago

    Cooler Master HAF, otherwise known as Hot as Fuck. Seems appropriate for the AH guys.

  • KrustyEARS

    KrustyEARS

    1 year ago

    Any difference between a Geforce graphics card and a Radeon graphics card? Like what does one have what the other doesn't?

    • thekaidis

      thekaidis

      1 year ago

      Overarching differences:

      Nvidia's GeForce line has the following:

      - PhysX, a proprietary fluid material physics engine which adds some eye candy to a couple games which support it (look up Borderlands 2 PhysX for a decent demo)

      - Shadowplay, automatic H.264 game recording and Twitch broadcasting (among other things, I haven't used it extensively yet)

      - Improved CUDA processing for specific rendering/computation programs which need it

      - Generally, better power efficiency per processing power

      - Generally, more stringent standards for coil whine and noise on reference boards (aftermarket board and cooler design nullify this)

      - G-Sync, a proprietary technology which requires a compatible (expensive) monitor and allows dynamic variation of monitor refresh rate to match GPU output framerate, eliminating screen tearing (a la VSYNC) without the choppiness which VSYNC can sometimes create

      AMD Radeon has the following:

      - Generally better bundled game choices

      - Generally lower price per performance, at the cost of higher heat and power consumption

      - Better GPGPU on compatible programs, due to non-gimped FP64 performance

      - Mantle support, a new API which promises to reduce CPU overhead in gaming tasks (so far implemented in a few games). However AMD has stated that Mantle will be open for all developers and hardware, differing from Nvidia's usual closed business model. This means Mantle may end up not being an AMD exclusive.

      - FreeSync, AMD's competitor to GSync (which AFAIK has not hit the market yet)

      - At the very high end, better performance at extreme resolutions (Eyefinity, 4K)Overarching differences:

      Nvidia's GeForce line has the following:

      - PhysX, a proprietary fluid material physics engine which adds some eye candy to a couple games which support it (look up Borderlands 2 PhysX for a decent demo)

      - Shadowplay, automatic H.264 game recording and Twitch broadcasting (among other things, I haven't used it extensively yet)

      - Improved CUDA processing for specific rendering/computation programs which need it

      - Generally, better power efficiency per processing power

      - Generally, more stringent standards for coil whine and noise on reference boards (aftermarket board and cooler design nullify this)

      - G-Sync, a proprietary technology which requires a compatible (expensive) monitor and allows dynamic variation of monitor refresh rate to match GPU output framerate, eliminating screen tearing (a la VSYNC) without the choppiness which VSYNC can sometimes create

      AMD Radeon has the following:

      - Generally better bundled game choices

      - Generally lower price per performance, at the cost of higher heat and power consumption

      - Mantle support, a new API which promises to reduce CPU overhead in gaming tasks (so far implemented in a few games). However AMD has stated that Mantle will be open for all developers and hardware, differing from Nvidia's usual closed business model. This means Mantle may end up not being an AMD exclusive.

      - FreeSync, AMD's competitor to GSync (which AFAIK has not hit the market yet)

      - At the very high end, better performance at extreme resolutions (Eyefinity, 4K)



      Post edited 5/13/14 12:39PM

  • DoctorOfFunk

    DoctorOfFunk

    1 year ago

    Happy to see the specs, interesting to look at and compare with my computer.

  • ZestForGames

    ZestForGames

    1 year ago

    Do you find WD Hard-Drives reliable? Here in the UK they just seem to blow up after being used more than twice.

    • thekaidis

      thekaidis

      1 year ago

      Blacks are expensive but fast & reliable (and have a 5-year warranty). Blues are OK, failure rate no higher than competitors. Greens are crap (this is what you'll find in a lot of external hard drives and pre-built PCs) because of low reliability and auto-standby. I use 4x4TB Reds in my NAS, they're rated for more stressful environments and longer MTBF but are relatively slower (not a problem for network storage).

      Their warranty service, though, is IMO the best in the business. Hitachi's high-end drives are faster and have a lower failure rate, but god help you if you want to actually get an RMA through in a reasonable amount of time.

    • Adam

      Adam Director of Technology

      1 year ago

      Only the "Black" models. Dont use greens for anything.

  • Gymmay2

    Gymmay2

    1 year ago

    Cool. You preempted my SSD question. Overkill is smart, I do it too, that way you don't have to upgrade every year or two years.